Collaboration and Annotation Tips for Students Using Remarq® image

Remarq Lite offers students tools to boost their participation and collaboration, and enrich their online reading experience. You can use the Remarq Lite browser extension on any site you read, whether for projects, hobbies, or schoolwork. If your instructor or professor has suggested you to use this tool, here are a few ways you can use it: 1. Mark key passages to revisit later. You can easily identify key points and terms, such as the thesis statement or main argument, and mark these quickly so you can revisit them later. 2. Use notes to record questions about something, or to add your interpretation. Notes are a great way to contribute something to the discussion of the material. 3. Collaborate in ...

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Tips for Teachers Using Remarq® Lite image

The Remarq Lite browser extension is an easy-to-use tool to bring online note-taking collaboration to your classes and projects. Setting up a private group for the class opens up many opportunities, and having your students contribute source material, notes, and comments into the group fosters group learning and collaboration. You can use Remarq Lite to do many things: Source reading and annotation. Encourage your students to read source materials carefully and take advantage of the annotation tools. Give challenge goals for number of annotations, and to find specific passages and add thoughts via Remarq’s note-taking functions. Teach by example. Model effective reading and annotation by sharing your annotations with the group. Foster collaboration. Create an environment where students can be ...

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RedLink Extends Remarq® to Education with “Lite” Browser Plug-in image

October 24th, 2017, Westborough, MA — Remarq®, the decentralized scholarly collaboration network from RedLink®, has launched a Chrome browser extension to facilitate annotation, collaboration, and connection across the Web. This tool is designed to help students and instructors be more effective in their classroom collaborations, while also extending the value of Remarq for scholarly users generally. Called Remarq Lite, this browser extension allows users to seamlessly integrate notes and highlights from any online source into their unified Remarq profile. It also allows users to create and join public and private groups for collaboration. The plugin is free, and available for download now. Remarq Lite works best with Chrome. It is also compatible with Firefox, Microsoft Edge, and Safari as a bookmark users can activate ...

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Remarq® Launches “Lite” Version to Support Students, Instructors image

Remarq®, the decentralized scholarly collaboration network, has launched a Chrome browser extension to facilitate annotation, collaboration, and connection across the Web, specifically to help students and instructors be more effective in their classroom collaborations, while also extending the value of Remarq for scholarly users generally. Called Remarq® Lite, this browser extension allows users to seamlessly integrate notes and highlights from any online source into their unified Remarq profile. It also allows users to create and join public and private groups for collaboration. The plugin is free, and available for download now. Remarq Lite works best with Chrome. It is also compatible with Firefox, Microsoft Edge, and Safari as a bookmark users can activate (fully integrated plugins for these browsers are being developed). ...

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Get Going with Group Conversations in Remarq® image

Remarq’s new Groups features take scholarly collaboration to a whole new level. Users can create free Public or Private groups. Publishers get the added benefit of creating Protected groups, which users can ask to join. Groups can be used to support a number of tasks, collaborations, or initiatives. Here are a few ideas: PRIVATE GROUP IDEA: A work, study, or project group. Invite your colleagues at work or school into a private Remarq group, where you can use Remarq® Lite and Remarq® on publisher sites to collaborate on documents, textual passages, images, math formulae, video, and more. PRIVATE GROUP IDEA: An expert panel of collaborators. Whether an editorial board, guideline workgroup, study team, or committee, Remarq private groups can provide you with a ...

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RedLink Introduces Group Conversations in New Release of Remarq® image

Enhancements significantly increase the collaborative aspects of the decentralized scholarly network 10 October 2017, Westborough, MA — RedLink is pleased to announce the latest release of Remarq®, which includes three levels of group collaboration: Private Groups – only those invited by the host are aware of the group and can participate Protected Groups – publishers can create these groups, which anyone can find and request to join Public Groups – these groups are open to anyone at any time Readers, authors, editors, and publishers all have the opportunity to create group conversations and invite members for research, classroom teaching, or other collaborative projects.  Users can share annotations, comments, images, links, and files, and discuss articles with other group members. Remarq ...

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Thinking of Charlottesville image

The events in Charlottesville this weekend and their aftermath shocked most people. We’ve been thinking of Charlottesville for many reasons, including the friends we have made there via Silverchair Information Systems and the publishers who work with them. The actions of the white supremacists, racists, and bigots in Charlottesville are intolerable and inexcusable on their face. When those actions turn into domestic terrorism through the weaponizing of an automobile, events take on an entirely new gravity. We condemn anyone who seeks to divide Americans along any lines whatsoever — racial, financial, political, or spiritual. The American dream and idea is about inclusion, tolerance, freedom from fear, and freedom from want. We send our love to the residents of Charlottesville and ...

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Remarq™ and Commenting 2.0 image

Commenting has gotten a bad rap over the years, as many venues on social media and news sites have become breeding grounds for trolls. This has led to a belief in some corners that good commenting isn’t possible, can’t occur at scale, and that given all this, maybe scholarly publishers should just avoid it, despite examples of approaches that have worked, at least one for well more than a decade. Remarq™ brings new approaches to commenting that have been developed from lessons drawn from other successful venues, now brought to scale for the benefit of multiple communities: Commenters are qualified by education, publication, and membership criteria. Before anyone can make a public comment via Remarq, their educational, publication, and membership credentials are ...

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Sci-Hub Has Papers. Are You Keeping Your Users? image

The recent pre-print about scholarly materials available via Sci-Hub (https://peerj.com/preprints/3100/) reveals that most scholarly and scientific publishers have suffered what may be irreparable damage to their stores of intellectual capital. That said, their users remain loyal and remain engaged with their brands — for now. The game has clearly shifted, from protecting content to protecting user loyalty. If publishers can do that well, they could make Sci-Hub a toothless threat. Remarq™ is built to increase engagement on the publisher’s Version of Record. It does this by encouraging collaboration, fostering engagement with a trusted brand and its emissaries (editors, authors, publishing personnel), supporting legal article-sharing, and making it easy to connect with colleagues. Studies have shown that despite this wide availability of ...

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Star Wars, Tesla, and the Evolution of Things image

There are inflection points in the development of various technologies and media, points of departure before which things were a jumble and after which change accelerates and there’s no turning back. Take, for instance, color in cinema. It had been experimented with and dreamed about and talked about, but once The Wizard of Oz brought it to life in a memorable, mainstream, and meta manner (with the movie itself jumping from black-and-white to vibrant color inside the movie), there was no turning back. A similar moment came in the late 1970s for cinema with the release of the original Star Wars. There’s a convincing argument that you can describe people as pre-Star Wars or post-Star Wars in their expectations of special effects, ...

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